One Man’s Lean Journey: My First Kanban System

Working for the automotive supplier, I had moved from industrial engineer to program manager and now into the lean group. The lean group comprised of just myself and one other, Joe Wilson who has contributed here at Beyond Lean.

One of our first assignments was to implement a plant-wide kanban system in 4 weeks. It was a mandate that came down from our Vice President to all the plants. In that short time, Joe and I had to learn about kanban, devise a system, create a simulation to teach 500 employees and implement the system.

Good thing we were young and full of energy back then, because I don’t know how we did it but we did. We developed kanban cards by color signifying which department the card need to return to in order to place the order for more parts. We then created a very simple Lego simulation. The simulation was good for 5-6 people at a time and allowed each person to be hands in order to create better learning. We also used the exact kanban card that we were going to put on the shop floor for the simulation so the employees got used to seeing them and could give feedback on them. We then trained 500 people on the simulation, five at a time across three shifts.

One rule we stressed the employees was, “Do NOT violate the kanban!” If you don’t have a card, you don’t build. Even if you know cards are in the internal customer’s hand and haven’t been brought to you. That holds the customer accountable for “ordering” the parts from the supplying department.

Everyone was ready to go live on our due date and we nailed it. Not saying there weren’t problems, but we hit the date and people were trying their best to follow the new procedures.

Then it happened. Our go-live date was mid-June. If you are familiar with the auto industry, everyone shuts down for retooling for a week or two around July 4th. So one week into the kanban system, our management was telling everyone to violate the kanban in order to build the bank of parts for the few shipments we have during the two week shutdown.

Yep. Violate the Number 1 Rule right out of the gate. It caused Joe and I a lot of rework after shutdown to get the kanban system back up and running. In the end, it worked well thanks to the great employees and the management support, but the false start didn’t help.

Reflections:

  • Building the bank of parts for shutdown was the correct thing to do at July 4th. What we need to be more conscious of is when we start something. It would have been better to start the kanban training after shutdown so we didn’t have the false start and have management telling everyone to violate the number 1 rule right off the bat.
  • We made kanban cards that were small. 4 inches x 3 inches or so. Cards were get dropped and lost quite a bit. It is better to make larger kanban cards (8 inches x 6 inches). It is harder to lose these because they are easier to see and don’t fit in pockets without folding a laminated card.
  • Creating a simulation that allowed everyone to be hands-on and using the actual kanban card from the floor really helped to create learning, understanding and good dialogue with the employees.
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Posted on February 9, 2015, in One Man's Lean Journey, Tools and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. Hi Matt

    I can agree with you fully even though banking parts was a good idea at that point the timing was off for the program launch. It would have been much better to launch after shut down. Simulation games especially ones that use Lego are highly beneficial in helping adults learn. Much of that comes from the fact as we get more removed from school it gets harder for most people to pick up concepts until they experience them, life experience not abstract education become our primary method of learning..

  2. Interesting article.

    I just don’t like that the request came directly from your VP…
    Of course it is good that there is a senior manager to support the Lean jurney but in order to make it really good the old simple logic need to be applied:

    “Flow where You can otherwise build a controlled inventory”

    I just want to say that by analyzing the value stream perhaps instead of building a kanban system at a certain points probably improving the flow of products, material and information may be more helpful for the business…

    I just completed a kaizen a month ago where we took away an existing kanban shelf since we could improve flow…

    Anyway. Thank You very much for the article 🙂

  1. Pingback: One Man’s Lean Journey: My First Kanban S...

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